Friday, July 1, 2016

Japanese Beetle Blues 2016

Unlike welcoming the lazy days of summer, unwelcome Japanese beetles have emerged to begin their two month feeding frenzy. Their appearance is about three weeks earlier than last summer.  Maybe that means they'll die off three weeks earlier, doubtful.  My hunch is the numbers will be fairly numerous in my area and they will probably find new neighborhoods to torment. 

I wrote four blogs about them last summer, so for repetitive sake, click here to read - Japanese beetles.  This is the link to the fall blog, but a good place to start (backwards), plus all the links to my earlier blogs.  

In a nutshell, they are beyond annoying insects, they skeletonize foliage and flowers of many of our favorite landscape plants. They live for only three reasons - to screw, chew and destroy! 

Control sprays may not be 100% effective, so hand pick or flick reachable JBs into soapy water and toss dead contents often, they start to smell after a few days. Stay on top of removal because if you don't, more will arrive to join in their party feast.  And never crush them in place, their dead parts attract more beetles. Commercial or homemade traps aren't recommended either.  They catch lots of beetles, but they signal more to the area.

 
I mentioned controls in my earlier blogs, but one product, a very environmentally safe product Btg is totally sold out from mail order companies until later in the summer. 

Check out Dr. Cranshaw's Colorado State University fact sheet for more information and controls for Colorado - Japanese beetle Fact Sheet 5.601



Check out my July 2, 2016 Denver Post Punch List - Tips for Fighting Japanese Beetles  

Check out my home mixed cedar oil JB beetle sprayAugust Insect Invasion

This chart on plants they favor or mostly avoid is compiled to the best of my knowledge from reliable university and government fact-based websites.  



Trees/Shrubs JB Favor
Trees/Shrubs JB Do Not Favor
Perennials JB Favor
Perennials JB Do Not Favor
American and English Elm
Arborvitae
Grape
Hellebore
Birch
Boxelder
Hollyhock
Iris
Black Walnut
Boxwood
Rose
Liatris
Hawthorn
Dogwood
Raspberry
Lily
Horse Chestnut
Euonymus (burning bush)
Virginia Creeper
Columbine
Norway Maple
Forsythia
Silver Lace Vines
Lily-of-the-Valley
Larch
Holly
Hibiscus
Coreopsis
Linden
Juniper
Common Mallow (weed)
Larkspur
London Planetree
Lilac (Common)
Evening Primrose
California Poppy
Malus spp. (crabapple, apple, etc.)
Magnolia
Clematis
Foxglove
Mountain Ash
Mulberry
Peony
Coral Bells
Pin Oak
Northern Red Oak
Joe Pye Weed
Hosta
Pussywillow
Pine
St. John’s Wort
Impatiens
Prunus (flowering cherry, etc.)
Red and Silver Maples
Coneflowers


Beech
Redbud
Hops
Forget-me-knot
Rose of Sharon
Spruce

Pachysandra
Rose
Sweet Gum

Poppy

Tulip tree

Moss Rose

Yew

Sedum



Yarrow



Milkweed and Butterfly Weed



Aster



Baptisia



White Mums



Dianthus



Bleeding Heart



Gallardia



Geum



Baby’s Breath



English Ivy



Beebalm



Obedient Plant



Spiderwort



Veronica






Annuals/Vegetables/Herbs JB Favor
Annuals/Vegetables/Herbs JB Do Not Favor
Cannas
Begonias
Gladiolus
Caladiums
Sunflower
Dusty Miller
Morning Glory
Ageratum
Cardinal Flower
Lantana
Zinnia
Nasturtium
Anemone
Violet/Pansy
Dahlia
White Geranium
Sweet Potato Vine (seem to like darker varieties) in my garden
Snap Dragons
Asparagus
Cosmos
Rhubarb
Ornamental Kale
Green Beans
Nicotiana
Soybeans
Ornamental Pepper
Sweet Corn
Petunia
Strawberries
Portulaca

Verbena

Garlic

Rue

Tansy

Catnip

Chives

Leeks

Onions

Tomatoes








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